Centro de Cuidados Integrales de Accidentes Cerebrovasculares

Grandfather with grandson riding a bike

Stroke is a medical emergency that affects the brain. It is the fifth leading cause of death and is a leading cause of disability in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Healthcare professionals know that "time lost is brain lost," so it is critical to obtain medical care as soon as the signs of a stroke become apparent.

Stroke, or a disruption in blood flow to the brain, does not have to be fatal, and treatment within 60 minutes of the onset of a stroke can help prevent permanent disability. If you or someone around you shows signs of a possible stroke, call 9-1-1 immediately. If a patient is categorized as a "stroke alert," Emergency Medical Services will transport that patient to a designated stroke center for treatment.

Advanced Stroke Care

Wellington Regional Medical Center has been designated a Comprehensive Stroke Center by the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration. The hospital is one of only five in Palm Beach County to earn this accreditation, which ensures that the hospital complies with the highest standards in clinical practice guidelines, performance measurements and continuous improvement programs for stroke patients.

Wellington Regional Medical Center is also a Certified Advanced Primary Stroke Center by The Joint Commission, demonstrating compliance with The Joint Commission’s national standards and guidelines for healthcare quality and safety. To achieve this prestigious certification, Wellington Regional Medical Center underwent rigorous onsite evaluation by reviewers from The Joint Commission who have expertise in stroke care. A decision to award certification is based on an evaluation of compliance with the standards and clinical practice guidelines developed by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In addition, the hospital has also been named to the Get With the Guidelines®-Stroke Gold Plus Target: Stroke Honor Roll for 2018 by the American Heart Association.

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Rapid Stroke Response

When a "stroke alert" patient is transported to Wellington Regional Medical Center, members of a Stroke Alert Team work together to provide direct care to the patient, and assist the Emergency Department physician in a rapid examination, assessment and diagnosis. Teleneurology services may be used during this process.

Because "time is brain," a rapid response is essential for providing stroke patients with the best chance of recovery. Stroke is treatable, usually with a medication called tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) that helps break clots and can lessen the lasting effects of a stroke. The potential for the use of tPA is time-sensitive, so it is important to note the time the signs of stroke first appeared.

Wellington Regional Medical Center's goal in managing stroke patients is to improve neurologic recovery and help reduce the incidence of disability. The hospital's designation as a Primary Stroke Center shows that it offers high quality care to the community.

Primary Stroke Center and AHCA logos

Stroke Recovery

Recovery from a stroke cannot be easily predicted and may be affected by a number of factors, including the rapidity of recovery after the symptoms began, the severity of the symptoms, the size of the stroke and the cause of the stroke. Only about 20 percent of stroke patients have near to full recovery.

Long-term treatment and care for stroke patients may include medication, physical therapy and changes in personal lifestyle (tobacco cessation, dietary changes, daily exercise, etc.). For most patients, this can be done through outpatient rehabilitation and coordinated care between the neurologist and a primary care physician, but may require some time in a rehabilitation hospital. Caseworkers can help patients and families through this process, because it is often family support that keeps the recovery process on track after a patient returns home.

Learn to Act F.A.S.T

If you think someone near you is having a stroke, every second counts. Know the warning signs, identify stroke and CALL 9-1-1 IMMEDIATELY. The acronym F.A.S.T. can help you identify possible strokes:


F=FACE (ROSTRO)
Sonría. ¿Un lado del rostro está paralizado? ¿Puede ver la misma cantidad de dientes de un lado que del otro del rostro?


A = ARMS (BRAZOS)
Levante ambos brazos por 10 segundos. ¿Uno de ellos se cae?


S = SPEECH (HABLA)
Repita una oración simple. ¿El habla es poco clara o extraña? ¿Puede comprender lo que dice la persona?


T = TIME (TIEMPO)
Ante la presencia de estos síntomas, cada segundo cuenta. Llame al 9-1-1 de inmediato.

Buscar un médico para atención de accidentes cerebrovasculares

If you need a referral to a physician at Wellington Regional Medical Center, call our free physician referral service at 561-798-9880.